Cooking on fires and in the kitchen.

Cooking predates our becoming human beings. The earliest evidence of cooking is by Homo Erectus, and cooking food dramatically influenced our evolution into Homo Sapiens. We did not invent cooking, instead it is more accurate to say that cooking food made us what we are.

Cooking can be as simple or as complicated as you want it to be. The earliest evidence of cooking involves meat and vegetables being roasted over or in fires, a method that still works well over a million years later. Modern cooking can involve cooking a vacuum sealed piece of meat in a sous vide water bath for hours – that also works well. The content here aims to reflect the fact that all types of cooking can work well, but they all came from the simple act of throwing food into a fire.

While there is a focus on cooking over wood and charcoal fires it is hard to be able to do that well without also being able to cook on a controllable and predictable stove top and oven. This site provides recipes that can cooked using both methods, information and thoughts on ingredients, as well as basic instructions for a variety of cooking methods.

Recent Posts

  • Ginger Juice
    I frequently use fresh ginger, and most of the time I like to use fresh ginger juice. While I also use grated ginger, ginger powder, and ginger chopped or sliced in a bunch of ways, ginger juice has a lot of benefits. First of all – what is ginger juice? It is simply the juice …
  • Parting out a pork sirloin tip roast
    The pork sirloin tip roast is a great piece of meat for the price. It is what the name implies – the tip of the sirloin from between the leg and the pork loin. It has been carried regularly at Costco in recent years and is sold in 4 packs. You can also find it …
  • Burnt Tomatoes
    Burnt tomatoes are NOT roasted tomatoes. They are tomatoes (usually small cherry types) that have had the sliced side charred to black without cooking the inside of the tomato at all. Ideally the inside of the tomato shouldn’t get warmer than room temperature. Any small tomato works well with this technique, my favorite to use …
  • Fennel
    What makes fennel so great? For starters, it keeps for a very long time, so it is a good thing to have as a staple in your vegetable drawer. Roasted fennel also keeps well and can be coal or fire roasted on the weekend and used as an ingredient in many dishes throughout the week. …
  • Arugula
    Apparently arugula has a recent history of being used as some sort of political/cultural put down, as though it’s some super fancy vegetable. Nothing could be further from the truth. It is a green that has a real flavor to it, getting spicy as it matures. As a plant it thrives on abuse and self …